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Month: March 2018

Car maintenance and ceramic coating

Here are the 5 main reason to get a ceramic coating for your vehicle. Read more at hawaiiautodetail.com

Maintenance of any car is usually an expensive affair. This is especially because the initial thing that comes into the mind whenever you take into consideration car maintenance is when expensive the accessories are saved to the market today. Except in the case where replacing exhausted parts is inevitable, proper maintenance of your jeep is a lot less expensive than dipping into your pocket to get a new accessory when your jeep in time breaks down.

Are you a proud owner of a whole new car? Are you trying your very best to deal with your new car? We all know that car is not any more viewed as a status symbol. It has now become a necessity. Buying a car is not just the end. It is just first that you have to endure lots of things to keep your car inside a great shape.

Hot Water Carpet WashingSome cleaning contractors use heated RV carpet cleaning machines. These machines have a very heating unit, utilized for heating water for extracting tough stains. Heated rug cleaner machines have some of advantages. Hot water, for example, is among the most effective and safest methods to clean grimy, greasy carpets. Heat melts grease, making carpet washing easier. These powerful carpet washer machines achieve temperatures as high as 210??F. If equipped with a powerful heating unit or two elements, the machine can perform high temperatures in just five minutes.

If your car has simply died and you were made to buy another car or truck that will or cannot be running then you’re fully able to reuse the first sort auto components that you’ve from the previous automobile into this new used car that’s purchased. For example, if the new used automotive which was purchased solely posesses a bad alternator, nevertheless the alternator inside the non-running car is at excellent condition then there may basically be an exchange of auto components between your two cars. Of course, this goes for just about any other situation in places you will want your previous auto parts with this automobile that you’ve got.

Once you understand the differences between the walk behind lawnmowers available on the market (in addition to their individual pros and cons) you’ll be in a very superior decision to select a model for use on your property. Don’t just choose the cheapest option if it’s going to put a great deal of stress on other areas you have ever had – shop wisely!

2019 Ram 1500 truck will cost $33,340 to start, around $60K fully equipped

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Most configurations of the 2019 Ram 1500 will cost a few hundred dollars more than the outgoing truck when it goes on sale later this month, the truckmaker announced Tuesday. But most trucks may end up costing less.

Confused? So were we.

The small price hike is for some configurations of the truck including the base Tradesman, Longhorn, and top-trim Limited versions. Some trim levels, such as Bighorn and Rebel, have slashed their prices over last year.

DON’T MISS: 5 things to know about the 2019 Ram 1500

The base 2019 Ram 1500 Tradesman Quad Cab 4×2 will cost $33,340, including $1,645 for mandatory destination fees, which is $800 more than a similarly equipped 2018 Quad Cab model. Base versions will be equipped with a 3.6-liter V-6, an 8-speed automatic, 18-inch steel wheels, vinyl seats, and a handshake. (Destination charges were raised by $250 for 2019.)

A top-of-the-line 2019 Ram 1500 Limited Crew Cab 4×4 will start at $59,035, before additional options, and feature Ram’s 12-inch touchscreen for infotainment, a 5.7-liter Hemi V-8, power-adjustable heated and cooled leather seats, wood dash, and another handshake. The 2018 Ram 1500 Limited cost $595 less.

Some popular trim levels, such as Rebel and Bighorn, get price cuts for 2019. The 2019 Ram Rebel Crew Cab 4×2 will cost $45,640, including destination, which is $1,300 less than the outgoing model. Bighorns shave roughly $2,000 from their 2018 prices, depending on box and powertrain configuration.

MUST READ: 2019 Ram 1500 first look: big rig turns the page

Stepping up to a V-8 from a V-6 in 2019 will cost $1,195 for 2019 trucks, down from $1,950 for 2018 models. Opting for Ram’s mild-hybrid powertrain in V-8 versions will add $800; all trucks equipped with a V-6 get the 48-volt system. Trucks equipped with the mild-hybrid system will go on sale later this year.

Adding four-wheel drive requires $3,500 extra; adding more leg room by opting for Crew Cab versions from Quad Cab tacks on $2,700 or $2,800, depending on trim levels.

Ram has announced that it will sell previous-generation Ram 1500s alongside new Ram 1500s, but didn’t specify how much those fleet-focused trucks will cost.



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2018 Audi S4 Review, Ratings, Specs, Prices, and Photos

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A far cry from the Skittles-colored sports sedans of the 1990s, the new 2018 Audi S4 is more serious about its looks and its mission. The four-door performance sedan now better occupies a space between luxury and high-performance with a seamless blend of both. The S4 is available in Premium Plus and Prestige trims.

The S4 earned a 7.4 on our overall scale, which is very good for a new car. Its performance and standard features are impressive and it keeps pace with similar offerings from BMW and Mercedes-Benz. (Read more about how we rate cars.)

Style and performance

Review continues below

The Audi S4 has been given a thorough once-over like the related (mostly) two-door S5. Unlike the S5, the S4 only comes in one smartly styled shape.

Like the A4 before it, the S4 is sharpened from the last generation, with a lower nose and raised headlights, and sharper creases along the sides. The hood’s shunt lines are hidden by a deeply pressed crease in the body panels and helps the S4 achieve a more serious look. Standard LED headlights help frame the car’s arrival; wispy, but pronounced, boomerang lights look better than their S5 counterparts.

Along the sides, the S4 gets a deeper crease in the body that doesn’t read big under showroom lights, but does on the road. With just a bright disk in the sky projecting one source of light overhead (aka the sun), the S4’s body line casts a bigger shadow along the profile that allays our concern that Audi stylists were lazy (or, perhaps lazier).

The S4’s interior is subdued, with the same hewn approach as the outside. Deep comfortable buckets are accented by diamond-quilting patterns; the door inserts are shod with Alcantara and red contrast stitching; the instrument panel and center console are streamlined with available carbon-fiber inlays.

Spending more on an S4 gets more interior features but regardless of trim, the S4 is powered by a new turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6 that produces 354 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque. The single twin-scroll turbocharger is planted between the cylinder banks to feed both sides, but will feed one bank first to reduce turbo lag. In our testing, we found that it works; the S4 never feels out of breath. It rockets the S4 up to 60 mph in 4.4 seconds, which is quicker than the BMW 340i and Mercedes-AMG C43.

The new turbo V-6 benefits from Audi’s long history with forced induction. Turbo lag has been quelled to hardly register with the driver’s right foot—most of the available torque comes on at 1,350 rpm—and the acceleration is brisk and drama-free.

The S4 is all automatic this time around. An 8-speed automatic, related to the gearbox found in the RS 7, is the only partner available for the turbo-6. Although it rips off confident shifts, paddle-shifting the 8-speed isn’t especially precise or quick—the transmission will automatically shift at redline, manual mode or not. Regardless of selected drive mode, the S4 is eager to upshift to save fuel, unless you’re deep into the throttle.

Like previous generations, the S4 comes with standard all-wheel drive, which Audi calls Quattro. The 40/60, front-to-rear torque split is performance focused and keeps the car in shape while cornering. Grip isn’t easily given up, and when it does the S4 will politely chide drivers back into shape—no wild slides here.

Four-wheel independent suspension is standard, and a revised five-link setup up front has been cast out of more lightweight aluminum to reduce unsprung mass. Adaptive dampers are available on the S4 for the first time and drop the ride height by nearly an inch. Setting the dampers from Comfort to Dynamic stiffens the car, but we’d stop short of calling the S4 stiff. Each ride select setting—Comfort, Dynamic, Auto, and Individual—is closer to comfort than outright performance. It’s clear the S4 is meant to be a better all-rounder this time around.

A newly available sport rear differential—the first time it’s been offered on the S4 and the second-generation unit from Audi— shifts power side to side on the rear wheels, in addition to front-to-back duty that’s handled by the standard center differential. The rear differential makes the S4 a competent performer on the track, but it’s also bundled with a sport steering setup that we’d like to tame.

Although the dynamic ratio clearly quickens with more speed, its feeling through the wheel is somewhat unpredictable. Dial in the steering, and the S4 is eager to keep things comfort-first with a slow ratio, but the performance ledge approaches quickly and the end result can leave the sedan feeling a little too darty. We don’t think many drivers will notice unless that exuberance bites back, but we’d just like a little more progressiveness in the variable ratio.

Comfort, safety, and features

The S4 earns a slight edge over the mechanically related S5 due to slightly better packaging and a better driving position. The S4 is a true five-seater—6-footers can sit behind other 6-footers—and the addition of two doors made for better entry and exit into the second row.

Up front, comfortable sport buckets are complemented by standard seat massagers and are widely adjustable. In back, the two outboard positions don’t have the same bolstering as front seat riders, but are comfortable. Riding hump in the S4 may be a dicey proposition depending on how aggressive the driver is—be sure to call “shotgun” first.

The S4 features standard 60/40-split folding rear seats that supplement the trunk’s standard 13 cubic feet of cargo capacity.

Ride quality in the S4 falls closer to “comfort” than “performance,” which our backs appreciated after a long day behind the wheel. Audi doesn’t pipe in many engine sounds, and the rumble from quad-tipped exhausts out back is fairly muted too. The S4 doesn’t scream “sport sedan,” which may help explain part of its appeal.

Like the S5, it’s hardly likely that the S4 will ever be subjected to official crash tests. In the absence of data, we can draw from the related A4, which was named a Top Safety Pick by the IIHS.

The S4 comes equipped with “Pre sense city” advanced safety as standard equipment that was rated as “Superior” by the IIHS. Blind-spot monitors, parking sensors, and a surround-view camera system are optional extras, but thankfully a rearview camera is standard.

The rest of the S4’s standard feature list is impressive too. All versions of the S4 get sport buckets with a diamond-quilted pattern, front seat massagers, automatic climate control, Bluetooth connectivity, 18-inch wheels with summer 245/40 summer tires, LED headlights, leather seating with Alcantara inserts on the doors, a 7.0-inch driver information screen and a 7.0-inch infotainment screen is standard with Audi’s MMI interface.

A word about MMI: It runs Audi’s native infotainment system very well with its clickwheel. Plug in a smartphone and prepare to run iOS or Android with chopsticks. It’s frustrating and hard to use. We wish Audi would offer a touchscreen by now, but we can’t have nice things.

Among the S4’s options list, we have our faves. The rear sport differential and adaptive suspension for $2,500? Check. Technology package that transforms the S4’s interior with “Virtual Cockpit” that includes a 12.3-inch driver information cluster and an upgraded 8.3-inch infotainment screen? Check. Navarra blue paint for $575? Check again.

Pinching pennies? Skip the $1,150 sport steering (too finicky), $500 warm weather package (heated seats are standard and the heated steering wheel doesn’t have a flat bottom), and bigger wheels.

At $51,875 to start for a Premium Plus model the S4 isn’t exactly budget car buying. We get that. But after riding in a $54,000-ish A4 loaded to the gills, and a tastefully optioned S4 at just over $59,000 we felt like the latter felt like a $60,000 car—the former seemed like a stretch.

If you’re looking for fuel-efficient driving, the S4 will hardly satisfy. The EPA rates the S4 at 21 mpg city, 30 highway, 24 combined.



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