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2019 Jeep Grand Cherokee Review, Ratings, Specs, Prices, and Photos

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Not long ago, a $100,000 Jeep was a laughable idea. Times and tastes change.

Now, the 2019 Jeep Grand Cherokee can touch six figures and 60 mph faster than a Saturday spit-take.

The base Jeep Grand Cherokees Laredo is at least equipped with 17-inch wheels, cloth upholstery, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, two USB charging ports, a 7.0-inch touchscreen for infotainment with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, Bluetooth connectivity, a rearview camera, parking sensors, and blind-spot monitors with rear cross-traffic alert—the last two are new for 2019.

That’s good equipment, but automatic emergency braking isn’t available on the base model and only standard on top trims. There are many bundles and trims to choose from, and all are equipped with a good infotainment system that earn points above average. We land at a 7 for features. (Read more about how we rate cars.)

Jeep offers the 2019 Grand Cherokee in seven trim levels: Laredo, Limited, Trailhawk, Overland, Summit, SRT, and Trackhawk that we distill down to three: Street, Trail, and Track.

The street versions, Laredo, Limited, and Summit editions are geared more toward on-road duty and daily detail. The trail versions, Trailhawk and Overland, can be fitted with beefier tires, tow hooks, off-road assist features, and an air suspension. The track versions: SRT and Trackhawk sub in go-fast gear that’s hardly believable on an SUV.

For the record: You can pay more than $100,000 for a Jeep Grand Cherokee. The 2019 Grand Cherokee Trackhawk starts in the mid-$80,000s and all-in with premium paint, rear-seat entertainment, a panoramic sunroof, premium audio and premium leather, it rings the bell at more than $100,000. On one hand, it’s the first six-figure Jeep from the factory. On the other hand, it’s a relative bargain next to Porsche Cayennes and BMW X5Ms. We’re not sold on its value, but those who may be swayed should consider that the Grand Cherokee Trackhawk is equipped with active dampers, 20-inch wheels, leather upholstery, premium audio that’s upgradeable to a 19-speaker system, active safety features (covered above), an 8.4-inch touchscreen for infotainment with navigation, and launch control. Guess what feature is our favorite.

We bring it back down to earth at the Overland trim level, which starts at half the cost of the fire-breathing Trailhawk, but offers the best mix of luxury and off-road features that we think will serve Jeep buyers well.

The Overland is equipped as standard with an air suspension, panoramic sunroof, 20-inch tires (18s are an option with off-road rubber), leather upholstery, premium audio, and an 8.4-inch touchscreen. Options include active safety features, which we recommend, or hardcore off-road add-ons such as skid plates, a full-size spare, and uprated four-wheel drive system with electronic locking rear differential.

Jeep infotainment

This year’s big upgrade inside for the 2019 Grand Cherokee is a high-resolution 8.4-inch touchscreen that’s standard in all trim levels above base Laredo, where it’s optional.

The 8.4-inch touchscreen features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, but we’re not so sure we’d give up control to the smartphones yet.

Jeep’s baked-in system, dubbed Uconnect, is responsive and intuitive, one of the best systems we’ve used. The icons are bright and clear along the bottom, with common-sense ways to navigate through the menus to set climate controls, radio station, or clock lap times.

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2019 Ford Taurus Review, Ratings, Specs, Prices, and Photos

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The 2019 Ford Taurus provides as close to a throwback to Detroit boulevardiers as we’re likely to see for a while. We like the Taurus SHO well enough, but our score here is based on the more popular non-performance models. They have a ride that’s soft, if not especially controlled, and handling that doesn’t mask its heft as well as its rivals.

We take back a point for the way the Taurus flops around on a curvy road, putting us at a 4 out of 10. (Read more about how we rate cars.)

Most Taurus models use a 3.5-liter V-6 rated at 288 horsepower and 254 pound-feet of torque that pairs to 6-speed automatic. Front-wheel drive is standard, while all-wheel drive is optional. The V-6 is smooth and refined and a low first gear helps it feel brisk enough around town. At highway speeds, the V-6 simply can’t overcome the Taurus’ curb weight.

The same is true for the way the Taurus handles. Its steering is direct, but this big sedan never feels nimble. Our compliments to the police officers who deftly hustle the Taurus around city streets. Instead, we’ve found that the Taurus is at its best when it settles into a comfortable cruise at highway speeds.

The Taurus SHO uses a twin-turbo 3.5-liter V-6 rated at 365 hp and 350 lb-ft of torque. All-wheel drive is standard equipment, and it does a good job of putting that power to the ground. Though the Taurus SHO is outmuscled by the Dodge Charger R/T, its smooth, broad torque curve makes highway passing a cinch. The SHO features a firmer suspension that we think does a better job of taking in most road surfaces.

An optional Performance Package for the SHO adds stronger brakes, revised steering tuning, different suspension settings, and summer tires. So-equipped, the Taurus SHO handles surprisingly well, although snow-belters will need to plan for a set of winter tires.

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2019 Subaru Impreza Review, Ratings, Specs, Prices, and Photos

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With the 2019 Impreza, Subaru courts its snowbelt base while piling on a high level of safety gear, a roomy interior, and decent fuel economy to appeal to places where snow isn’t a constant.

Overall, the Impreza earns 6.3 out of 10 points. (Read more about how we rate cars.)

Base, Premium, Sport, and Limited trim levels, each available in sedan and five-door hatchback flavors are on offer. For 2019, automatic emergency braking and adaptive cruise control are now standard on the Limited and newly available on the base trim level.

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Under its hood, the Impreza’s 2.0-liter flat-4 shuttles 152 horsepower to all four wheels, making these Subarus among the only all-wheel-drive compact cars. A choice of continuously variable automatic (CVT) and 5-speed manual transmissions are on offer. The Impreza can feel sluggish at speed but the CVT works especially well in town to provide a zippy low-speed feel.

In any trim, the Impreza handles well and provides a comfortable, composed ride. The Sport trim’s unique suspension dampers and steering tuning make it a little more fun, but it’s still short on power.

The Impreza shares its structure, its body, and its interior with the Subaru Crosstrek, a high-riding, crossover-like vehicle that delivers real off-road ability at the expense of some handling prowess and fuel economy.

Even with all-wheel drive, the Impreza delivers up to 32 mpg combined, according to the EPA.

Inside, what the Impreza lacks in an imaginative design it makes up for in roominess. The hatchback with its 55.3 cubic-foot maximum cargo capacity is especially impressive. A high level of standard equipment including a 6.5-inch touchscreen for infotainment with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. With every option box selected, the Impreza tops $29,000, but $25,000 buys the nicely equipped Impreza Premium hatchback with active safety gear that complements its impressive crash-test record.



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